acupuncture, fertility, herbal medicine, IVF, pregnancy, Traditional Chinese Medicine

The essence of my Master of Health Science (TCM) degree boiled down to 6 things you might not know about women’s health

2013: The original crew in our second year. We're all lecturers at Endeavour College of Natural Health now: Nicky Macdonald, Sarah George, Lori-Ellen Grant, David Schievenin
2013: The original crew in our second year. We’re all lecturers at Endeavour College of Natural Health now: Nicky Macdonald, Sarah George, Lori-Ellen Grant, David Schievenin

After four years of studying a Master of Health Science (Traditional Chinese Medicine) degree at the University of Western Sydney (UWS), balancing study with lecturing and clinical practice, I can say that I have finally finished! (It’s been such a long time the uni has even changed its name in that time to Western Sydney University – WSU!)

I am really glad I’ve had the opportunity to do this course. I have learnt so much, made great friends and studied under some of the great Chinese Medicine teachers in the world.

While I’m very grateful to have my Saturday nights back (no more late night researching and assignment writing) here’s a few things I am very happy to have learnt while reading everything I could on the following women’s health topics:

I studied a diverse range of topics in addition to women’s health (eg. osteoarthritis, anorgasmia and irritable bowel syndrome) which I’ll cover in subsequent blogs.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

Diet, fertility, food, Traditional Chinese Medicine

The aubergine eggplant: a therapeutic culinary delight

Mediterranean eggplant salad webDo you say eggplant or aubergine? This is one of those topics that can generate a heated dinner party discussion.

I say eggplant. But feel free to substitute aubergine in your head if it makes you happy.

And I do love a good eggplant dish. This weekend I have been enjoying this versatile fruit (yes, it has seeds which classifies it as a fruit) in a variety of tasty ways. There are just so many ways you can cook with it, including:

  • Stuffed
  • Baked
  • Fried, barbecued or grilled (then used as you wish – I love it in this warm salad with preserved lemons – pictured)
  • Stir-fried (one of my favourite dishes when I was studying in China was an eggplant and garlic dish)
  • Steamed
  • In casseroles
  • In curries (one of my favourite curries features pumpkin and eggplant – it is to die for!)
  • To replace toast (eggs on grilled eggplant slices) or lasagne noodles (layer eggplant slices)
  • In dips (as in baba ganoush)

If you’ve never cooked with eggplant before, this is how it can be prepared to reduce bitterness and reduce the amount of oil they soak up in cooking.

The humble eggplant has some fabulous Traditional Chinese Medicine therapeutic uses including:

  • Clears heat from the blood (e.g. red rashes, heavy menstrual bleeding , haemorrhoids or bleeding disorders in general).
  • Moves blood, harmonises the Liver and the Uterus (e.g. painful periods, irregular periods or clotted menstrual blood).
  • Reduces swelling and eases pain (e.g. premenstrual oedema, breast tenderness or mastitis).
  • Regulates and cools the intestines (e.g. constipation or diarrhoea where the stool is smelly and the patient feels hot or experiences burning sensations).
  • May be soothing for someone repressing emotions (e.g. anger, frustration, irritation and resentment).

Just a note, if you do suffer from menstrual or bleeding disorders these should be discussed with your health professional for appropriate investigations and  treatment options.

Have you got a favorite eggplant recipe?

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.