acupuncture, fertility, health, IVF, pregnancy

New clinic now open at Broadbeach on the Gold Coast

Clinic tableHello!

It’s been too long! I hope you’ve all been well.

Things have been both busy and restorative since I moved from Brisbane to be the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at Endeavour College of Natural Health’s Gold Coast campus.

So I have good news… my new clinic is open at Broadbeach – finally! Hooray!

To book, call: 07 5526 8632.

I have a lovely clinic space where you can enjoy Chinese Medicine services to enhance your health:

  • Acupuncture
  • Acupuncture Point Injection Therapy
  • TCM Remedial Massage (tuina)
  • Cupping and guasha
  • Chinese dietary therapy

My focus will continue to be on women’s health including pregnancy, fertility & IVF support, but also conditions including period pain, irregular menstrual cycles, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, proconception care, pre-birth treatment, menopausal symptoms, stress, anxiety, insomnia, digestive complaints, body pains and enhancing general wellbeing.

Enjoy the following clinic tour:

Clinic table supplies
Relax here…
Clinic books
More obstetric, fertility and women’s health texts than you can poke a stick at!
Clinic cups
Ever had cupping? It’s great – ask me about it.
Clinic bookshelf
Chinese medicine and natural health library

There’s plenty of free parking on the street too.

I’m also looking very forward to bringing you regular blog posts to help you to enhance your wellness too.

I hope to see you in clinic soon! And/or feel free to share this post with people you know on the Gold Coast who need a good acupuncturist.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

massage, Traditional Chinese Medicine

What is TCM remedial massage and who can it help?

Massage pushing web2Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) remedial massage, otherwise known as tui na, is a therapy that dates back two thousand years ago to ancient China. The words ‘tui na’ translate to ‘push grasp’ which describes this style of massage with its assorted techniques including kneading, tapping, rubbing and pressing. The pressure used is suited to the individual patient and can be light on the skin or firm for deep tissue techniques. Pressure is applied to acupuncture points to stimulate them for specific conditions.

This form of massage is part of the greater system of TCM, a diverse system of medicine that covers all major systems within the body; which means it can be used for a wide range of acute and chronic ailments. TCM is focused on treating the underlying cause of disease as well as the presenting symptoms. This involves a holistic approach linking the body, mind and emotions in both the cause of disease and its treatment. TCM remedial massage may also be used to optimise overall wellness.

How does TCM remedial massage work?

By using a range of massage techniques your massage therapist will aim at best treating the particular condition you wish to have treated – whether that’s pain relief, reducing tension, healing injury or just making you feel better.

Peer-reviewed medical research has shown that massage techniques may provide:

  • Pain relief – For musculoskeletal injuries, tension headaches and back pain.
  • Mental alertness – After massage, EEG patterns indicate enhanced performance and alertness on mathematical computations.
  • Reduced anxiety and depression – Massage nay reduce subclinical depression.
  • Detoxification – Massage may stimulate the immune system by increasing blood flow and lymph drainage.
  • Muscle recovery – Massage may help to clear muscles of lactic and uric acid that build up during exercise.
  • Muscle tone – Improving muscle tone and delaying muscle atrophy resulting from inactivity.
  • Prevent injury – Deep massage may separate fascial fibres, prevent adhesions and reduce inflammation and oedema.
  • Relaxation – The release of endorphins and serotonin inducing a relaxed, ‘feel good’ state may improve sleep, reduce blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Healing – Massage may increase circulation and therefore improves the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the cells.

Traditionally, acupressure is explained by influencing the flow of Qi (energy or life force) within the body. For example, someone with throbbing headaches has too much Qi moving upwards, or someone with pain that is worse for rest has Qi that is ‘stuck’ or not circulating well. Researchers have identified that stimulating an acupuncture point (with a needle or acupressure) can create measurable changes in the body. Acupuncture points have an influence over the area that surrounds them. An acupuncture point can also have an influence over areas far removed from the actual point being needled.

Who can benefit?

TCM remedial massage is ideal for most musculoskeletal pain. It can also be beneficial for other health conditions, particularly when combined with acupuncture and/or other techniques such as cupping or herbal medicine.

People who can benefit from TCM remedial massage include those with specific pains such as stiff neck, tight shoulders or lower back pain; as well as anyone who suffers from chronic stress or general muscle tension.

I have many clients who choose to book regular monthly massages to promote wellness, reduce stress and prevent injury.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

Diet, food, food allergy, health, mental health, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Happy new year! And highlights from the Woodford Folk Festival

DSC00608Happy new year to all of my lovely readers!  I hope your 2013 is shaping up just dandy so far.

I have been lucky enough to spend the 2012/13 transition at the Woodford Folk Festival.  Again this year I was speaking at the fabulous Blue Lotus health and healing venue with my wonderful naturopathic colleague, Kathleen Murphy.

We spoke on “Gluten & Grain Intolerance” and “Vegetarian v Omnivore diets”.  Kath gave the nutrition essentials and I was able to give the Traditional Chinese Medicine spin on each of these.  Both talks were well attended with a great crowd who asked lots of excellent questions.  If you were there, thanks for being such an awesome audience – especially if you came to our New Year’s Day morning talk.  Good health vibes to you!

DSC00639Additionally, we ran a new workshop in the Children’s Festival this year – “Bath time – soothe time”.  In essence it was all about calming babies and small children before bed.  We chatted about good digestion tips, essential oils, herbal teas, acupressure and massage.  The highlight for me was giving a four-year old her first massage – she just about melted into her chair.  See, massage is for all ages, and kids (big and little) love ’em!

I’ll write more on the gluten and diet talks on this blog in coming days.  So stay tuned.

So, as usual, I have returned to reality, still with my post-festival glow (why do I love Woodford? – find out here) and hit the ground running at HealthWise Clinic practicing Monday to Friday for all of January.  If you are in need of re-stoking your glow for 2013 come and see me in the clinic.

May 2013 be your most radiant year yet!

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

massage

It’s on again: learn to massage for wellbeing

BL massage courseThe great people at Bright Learning are repeating the Massage for Wellbeing one day course and I’m delighted to be asked to teach it once again.

Last year we had a lot of fun and at the end of the day I had a roomful of very relaxed people.  Think of how you feel after one massage and then times that by 3 or more! It was a Saturday well spent. This is what one of my last students said.

So, the course will teach you everything you need to know to give a partner, friend or family member a really good seated massage.

Why should you learn to massage?  Here are five good reasons.

Actually, this would make an excellent Christmas gift for someone you want to receive a good massage from!

The details:

  • Date: Saturday, 9th February 2013
  • Time: 10am – 4pm
  • Place: Bright Learning HQ, Teneriffe
  • Early bird rate applies until 19th January!

Book here through Bright Learning.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

exercise, martial arts, massage

Massage tension away with a foam roller

foam rollerI often recommend the use of a foam roller to my acupuncture and massage patients who suffer from pain associated with tense backs, buttocks, iliotibial bands (ITBs), hamstrings and calves.  I love doing these stretches myself and they are an excellent way to give yourself a little massage for pain relief and injury prevention.  My back and legs appreciate a good stretch and massage after karate training or a long bike ride. Whether you exercise a lot, are very sedentary or somewhere in between, these exercises may help to reduce your muscle tension. Do them daily for best results.

Daily stretching and self massage will enhance the effect of your acupuncture and massage treatments. If you are suffering from strong pain, numbness or tingling make sure to seek treatment from your health professional.

Here are a few videos of how to use your foam roller for common areas of tension:

Thoracic spine and chest stretch

These stretches focus on the du, ren, gall bladder, lung, pericardium and heart acupuncture channels.

Thoracic spine mobilisation

This massage technique focuses on the du and bladder acupuncture channels.

Buttock massage

These massage technique focuses on the bladder and gall bladder acupuncture channels.

ITB massage

This massage technique focuses on the gall bladder acupuncture channel.

Hamstring and calf massage

This massage technique focuses on the bladder acupuncture channel.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture, health, massage, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Uncategorized

Take a short course in acupressure

After the success of the introductory Massage for Wellbeing course held earlier in the year, the great people at Bright Learning have asked me to teach a course in Acupressure for Quick Relief.

Acupressure is a technique I use a lot in my own life, with friends and family, plus I often teach particular techniques to my acupuncture patients to do between their appointments.  It is an ancient healing technique, which relies on pressing certain points that stimulate the body’s natural healing abilities. Its principles are used more frequently than you think, for example the sea sickness bands act on a point on the wrist that relieves nausea.

Acupressure can be done easily and effectively particularly on oneself, or your loved ones.

I’ll be presenting this short class on 21st August from 6pm to 8.30pm at Salt House in New Farm.  We are going to cover the following topics:

  • The theory behind acupressure
  • Understanding Qi
  • Key points in the body
  • Perfecting the technique
  • Exercises to calm or stimulate energy
  • Tips to reduce stress
  • Benefits of 5 minutes a day

For more information or to book a place click here or contact Bright Learning on 07 3013 2413.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

health, massage

Take a course in massage for wellbeing

Come and learn to massage with me on Saturday 18th February 2012.

Massage for Wellbeing

Start as you intend to go on! Begin 2012 loving and caring for your body by learning how to give a proper head, shoulder, neck, arms & hands massage.

In this one day course, I will not only teach you how to massage to another person, but will also cover off self-massage techniques for wellbeing.

Details and booking info here.  Early bird rate finishes on 13th January 2012.

You’ll learn from this course:

  • The benefits of massage
  • Common sore points
  • Basic massage techniques and when to use what
  • How to assess tense areas
  • When NOT to massage and practicing safely
  • Learning a simple self massage sequence
  • Basic acupressure points
  • Creating a simple massage sequence to give to another

The course will run in seated positions and fully clothed.

This course is suitable for those who would like to learn how to massage friends and family, as it does NOT lead to any formal qualifications.

Read five reasons why you should learn to massage for fun!

Diet, emotional health, exercise, food, health, massage, mental health, motivational, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Uncategorized

The Woodford Folk Festival guide to a happy, healthy year

Teaching acupressure at the Children's Festival

Firstly, a very happy new year to you!  As many of you know, over this new year period Kathleen Murphy and I presented our popular “Herbs, health and acupressure” workshop at the Woodford Folk Festival.  We were also invited to speak on the Woodforum raw food panel which attracted a crowd that packed the impressive Blue Lotus venue.  I, of course, promoted the Traditional Chinese Medicine view-point that a little raw food is ok, but that generally speaking, a healthy diet should consist of mainly warm, cooked meals.  (It should be noted that cooked foods don’t need to be unhealthy.  For example, they don’t have to be laced with saturated fats, excessively meat or refined carbohydrate based, burnt to a carcinogenic crisp or boiled to nutritional oblivion.  But more on that topic in another blog.)  Thanks to those who came to see us speak and ask questions.  It was an absolute delight to share our knowledge with you.

Here’s some health and happiness promoting lessons I picked up at the Woodford Folk Festival to apply to your everyday life for a happy, health year ahead:

  1. Starting each morning with yoga is a great way to wake up, stretch your muscles and align your spine (particularly after several nights on an air mattress).
  2. Queues are a way of meeting new people and learning new things. (For instance, I learnt from a volunteer S-Bend Warrior that festival punters were expected to go through 15,000 rolls of toilet paper in total for the week – that equated to an eighth of a roll per person – quite interesting). And it’s nice to say hello to people you don’t know.  Just like the good ol’ days.
  3. Learn a new skill on a regular basis.  At the festival I had the pleasure of crocheting a sandal, taking a dance workshop and giving a burlesque life drawing class a bash – each activity was great fun with good company (mostly new friends) and involved lots of laughs.  If the new skill you’d like to learn is massage, I can help you.
  4. Be creative on a daily basis.  Whilst chatting to a wise friend at the festival she floated the idea that creativity involves anything that allows you to express yourself in some way.  It could be music, dance, art, sport or fitness, food, the way you dress, be computer-related or really anything at all that ignites your inner artist.  She’s right.  Grant yourself time each day to get creative, even if it’s just the way you arrange food on your plate.
  5. Be involved in your community.  Our relationships and connections within our community contribute to our level of happiness.  Communities give us a sense of belonging and provide a place for us to give and receive, and to share.  Your community could be online or offline, related to your work, hobbies, education, family or place of residence.  Volunteering might be a great way to get involved with your community, or you could join a club, take a class, support local markets or music venues, or get to know your neighbours.  Endless possibilities.

May 2012 be your happiest and healthiest year yet.

aromatherapy, exercise, herbal medicine, martial arts, massage, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Bruise remedies for martial artists, athletes & the accident-prone

A very athletic (but non-ninja) friend called me on the weekend searching for a fast cure for bruising.  She had taken a bad tumble from her bicycle the week before she was to compete in a big triathlon.  She had bad bruising developing behind her knee that covered most of the back of her knee and part of her thigh.  With some wisdom from both the Chinese and western herbal medicine worlds, the bruising didn’t get anywhere near “as ugly as she had expected” and she’s been back on the bike painlessly getting her last training in before the big event this weekend.

My top 5 remedies for bruising that all martial artists (and anyone else) need to know:

  1. Ice.  But don’t overdo it.  Ice can be used in the first 24-48 hours of an injury occurring.  If the injury feels hot, looks red and is continuing to swell, you can apply ice.  Compression bandaging is useful at this time too.  There is no need for ice once these symptoms have stopped.
  2. Arnica. Arnica is known as ‘the herb for bruising’ in western herbal medicine.  I like the Sunspirit Arnica Ointment, which can be smeared over the injured body part (e.g. knee or ankle) and then wrapped with gladwrap and left over night. It contains a few other herbs to aid healing and give some pain relief.  Arnica can also do wonders for bruising when taken internally as a homeopathic remedy.  This gives you a way to tackle the bruising from the inside while you are busy addressing the local area of the trauma.
  3. Liniment.  Traditional Chinese Medicine offers us many liniments that lay claim to reducing bruising.  The most famous of these amongst martial artists is ‘Dit Da Jow’ or ‘Hit Medicine’. Some of my favourites that are more easily available are Zheng Gu Shui and Po Sum On.  Liniment needs to be applied to the local bruise area every few hours, throughout the days following the injury.  The herbs used in these liniments aim to promote blood circulation and thus disperse the blood that has stagnated.
  4. Rubbing.  Yes, we can rub the bruise out.  Sounds painful, and it can be, but it works a treat.  You need to take some of the liniment referred to above and moisten the bruised area.  Then place your thumb or fingers in the centre of the bruise, apply deep pressure and massage towards the outside of the bruise.  You can use a deep, flicking movement to do this.  We are aiming to move the stagnant blood away from the site of the trauma.  The bruise will change colour and intensity fairly quickly with this technique.  A note of caution.  Rubbing out a bruise may not be suitable on acute serious injuries.
  5. Heat.  So it’s ice that we use first of all, and then later we apply heat.  Ice is used to stop the swelling and bruise developing, and then we can go straight into applying a heat pack to reinvigorate blood circulation.  The idea is to slap on some liniment and apply your heat pack on top.  This will aid circulation to the area and the warmth will prepare the bruise nicely to be rubbed out.

A note for people who bruise easily.  If you are prone to bruising with light touch or without recollection of a trauma it may indicate that you have an underlying condition affecting your blood clotting or blood vessels.  Sometimes medications and even supplements (e.g. fish oil) or herbal medicines (e.g. ginkgo biloba) can contribute to thinning of the blood.  A tendency to easy bruising should be discussed with your acupuncturist, herbalist or general practitioner.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

emotional health, health, massage, mental health

Five reasons why you should learn to massage for fun

  1. Everyone loves a massage.
  2. Massage has lots of health benefits:
      • Pain relief – For musculoskeletal injuries, tension headaches and back pain.
      • Detoxification – Massage stimulates the immune system by increasing blood flow and lymph drainage.
      • Muscle recovery – Massage helps clear muscles of lactic and uric acid that build up during exercise.
      • Muscle tone – Improving muscle tone and delaying muscle atrophy resulting from inactivity.
      • Prevent injury – Deep massage can separate fascial fibres, prevent adhesions and reduce inflammation and oedema.
      • Healing – Massage increases circulation and therefore improves the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the cells.
  3. Massage promotes a sense of wellbeing:
      • Mental alertness – After massage, EEG patterns indicate enhanced performance and alertness on mathematical computations.
      • Reduced anxiety and depression – Massage has been shown to reduce subclinical depression.
      • Relaxation – The release of endorphins and serotonin inducing a relaxed, ‘feel good’ state can improve sleep, reduce blood pressure and heart rate.
  4. Helping someone else to relax and feel good, also makes the giver of the massage feel good too.
  5. There’s a good chance if you give a massage, you might get one on return, which is always nice. ( To increase your odds of this, make sure to encourage your partner/friend/family member to learn to massage with you).

Fancy learning to massage just for fun?  I’ll be teaching a “Massage for Beginners” course through the lovely people at Bright Learning on Saturday, 19th November, 2011.  We’ll also be touching on some useful acupressure skills too.

For more details or to book – click here.