Diet, food, food allergy, martial arts, recipe

Japanese noodle soup: a vegetarian and gluten-free take

20120819-103420.jpgThis recipe was inspired by my recent travel to Japan. Finding a good noodle soup for lunch after a hard karate training session was easy, but finding a vegetarian version – not so easy. I’ve been experimenting at home and have come up with this quick, easy and tasty Japanese-influenced noodle soup (and it’s gluten-free too).

Ingredients

  • 6 cups water
  • 100g thin rice noodles
  • 1 carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup tamari (gluten-free soy sauce)
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 2 tablespoons dried onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 bok choy, sliced
  • 2-4 eggs (1 per serve)
  • seaweed, shredded (to garnish)

Method

  1. Boil water in saucepan. Add noodles and carrot, cooking until noodles have softened.
  2. Add tamari, herbs and bok choy, simmering for 5 minutes.
  3. Divide soup into serving bowls. Crack an egg into each bowl of soup and top with seaweed. (When stirred with some chopsticks the egg white will resemble noodles.)

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

acupuncture, exercise, herbal medicine

The healing arts of the samurai

I have recently returned from my first (of many, I hope) trip to Japan.  It was my passion for karate that enticed me to visit this country, however I was fortunate to encounter some traditional medicine as I was taking a break from training in the dojo.

We visited the preserved samurai village, Kakunodate.  Here we were guided around one of the most impressive old samurai houses.  The house belongs to the Ishiguru family.  During the time of the samurai, this family obtained the first edition of Japan’s first anatomical text.  The family studied and practiced herbal medicine and acupuncture to treat illness and recover from injury.  The museum displayed their acupuncture needles, herbal medicine preparation tools and medicinal texts.

On returning to Tokyo, I had the opportunity to visit the Nihondo Kampo College.  Kampo is medicine system predominantly focussed on herbs.  It has its basis in Traditional Chinese Medicine but has been adapted by the Japanese to become a unique style of medicine.  Kampo medicines are part of Japan’s national health system.  The Nihondo Kampo college included a small but beautiful herbal medicine museum and many Five Element Theory displays.  (I’ll discuss some of these theories in future blogs.)  Their little shop sold medicinal herbal teas and soup stocks.  I could observe the student practitioners (in their white clinic coats just like in Australia) consulting with their patients and herbal medicines being prepared in their immaculate dispensary.  The college also boasted a vegetarian restaurant with meals cooked for the health of the patient.  Needless to say I was in my element!

These were just two highlights from my trip to Japan.  I look very forward to visiting this wonderful country again.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

martial arts

Off to Japan: a land of karate and herbal medicine.

Gosh!   It’s only one week until I fly off to Japan for two weeks!

What will I be doing there? Well, I’ll be joining fellow karateka from around the world for some intensive karate seminars with some of the Goju masters.  I’ll also be taking the opportunity to learn more about Japanese medicine and vist some medicinal herb gardens.

And rest assured, I will return with lots of photos and stories to share.  Stay tuned!

So, the dates to note are: I’ll be away from HealthWise Clinic from Monday 2nd July and will return on Wednesday 18th July 2012.   Acupuncture and massage bookings can be made by calling the clinic on 07 3839 1077.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture, exercise, health, martial arts

Karate: unlock the free flow of Ki

Believe it or not, traditional karate (such as Goju Karate Australia) has a lot in common with acupuncture. Each places great importance on the breath, focus/intent and flow of Qi (or Ki or vital force). They are considered both an art form and a science, being constantly questioned, refined and developed by the practitioner and their peers and mentors.

Even the acupuncture points and meridians are used in karate.  The acupoints and channels influence the flow of qi in the body, depending on how they are stimulated determines the result of their use.  In acupuncture, the acupoints are carefully selected and manipulated for their healing influence, in karate they become strike points or reflect body positioning and movement.

I find that practising karate improves my acupuncture through experience with energy flow (e.g. posture and breathing) and that knowledge of acupuncture points and channels benefits my karate. That’s why I love immersing myself in both!

Practitioners of Kung Fu, Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Aikido and other traditional martial arts all experiment with utilising this flow of Qi or Ki in their training but also in other aspects of their lives.

How do you unlock your Qi, Ki or Life Force?

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.