food, food allergy, recipe, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Choc-orange-ginger truffles – gluten & dairy free

choc trufflesI whipped up these delightful sweet treats several weekends ago. (My! How time flies!) I really do have a soft spot for chocolate and these are a great way to indulge my craving without any dairy or a large amount of added sugar. Plus the flavours are to die for!

Orange, ginger, cardamom, almond, cashew, hazelnut. They were all made to be blended with chocolate.

Luckily, these little truffles are also rich enough that you can’t eat too many in one sitting. And they are best shared with friends after dinner.

“What are the Traditional Chinese Medicine functions attributed to cardamom and ginger?”, I hear you ask. All is revealed here.

Choc-orange-ginger truffle recipe

Ingredients

  • 50g blanched almonds
  • 50g raw cashews
  • 50g hazelnut flour
  • 100g dried pitted dates
  • juice of one orange (about 3 tablespoons)
  • grated zest of one orange
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 2-3 green cardamom pods, ground
  • Uncrystallised ‘naked‘ ginger, cut into small pieces (1/2cm²)
  • Additional hazelnut meal and dessicated coconut for rolling

Method

  1. Add almonds and cashews to food processor and blend until ground. Transfer to a bowl.
  2. Add dates to food processor and blend until they resemble a paste. Add dates to nut mix.
  3. To nut and date mix, add orange juice, orange zest, maple syrup, cocoa and ground cardamom. Mix into a thick paste. Add hazelnut meal gradually to make mixture a good consistency for rolling.
  4. Take two plates and to one add desiccated coconut, and to the other add hazelnut meal. These will be for rolling the truffles in.
  5. Take a heaped teaspoonful of mixture and roll into a ball. Insert a piece of ginger into the middle of each ball and roll until smooth on the outside. Repeat until all of the mixture has been used. Then roll each ball in either coconut or hazelnut meal.
  6. Chill until ready to serve.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

Diet, food, food allergy, recipe

Choc-ginger-hazelnut biscuits

choc ginger hazelnut biscuitsThis weekend just gone I wanted to work through a few ingredients that were floating around in my pantry taking up space. It gave me the perfect opportunity to test run these rich and chewy chocolate almond cookies with a few of my own modifications. All of the ingredients I already had at home and the whole recipe took about 20 minutes from prep to eating time.

For the chocoholics among us, sometimes you need something on hand for a chocolate fix to prevent you from reaching that bit too often for those high sugar, low quality, impulse buy chocolates on offer. You need something with more protein, higher fibre and the option to control the sugar content that still hits the spot! These little biscuits do the job nicely in next to no time and with minimal washing up to do. Win-win!

Ginger is an excellent digestive herb and enhances digestion of the rich nut and cocoa ingredients. I could eat ginger with just about anything – read more about my thoughts on ginger and its many uses here.

Choc-ginger-hazelnut biscuits

Ingredients

  • 1 cup hazelnut meal
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1/4 cup sugar/stevia blend (or 1/2 cup sugar or suitable sugar substitute)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder (sifted)
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1-2 tablespoons dark choc chips (dairy-free if desired)
  • 1-2 tablespoons finely chopped crystallised ginger

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180ºC. Line or grease two baking trays.
  2. Mix all dry ingredients in large bowl.
  3. Add egg whites and vanilla extract to dry ingredients, stir until mixture has an even consistency.
  4. Add choc chips and ginger, mix through.
  5. Roll dessertspoonfuls into balls and flatten with a fork on baking trays.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes. Allow to cool on baking tray.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.