acupuncture, fertility, herbal medicine, IVF, pregnancy, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Can acupuncture enhance your fertility and support your pregnancy?

Pregnant belly kissHere’s a little guest piece I wrote for the Endeavour College of Natural Health Wellnation Clinics, How can Chinese Medicine enhance your fertility?

Helping men and women with fertility and those subsequent pregnancies is one of my favourite areas of practice, and one that I have studied intensively and had a lot of experience in treating with acupuncture and natural medicine treatment (whether it’s pre-conception care, assisting a patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome or low sperm count, or supporting a patient through IVF).

If you wish to have a baby, are having difficulty in conceiving or are looking for supportive care in pregnancy, please contact me. I’d be happy to assist you with your journey.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

Diet, food, food allergy, recipe

The joy of omelettes in pictures

The more colours the better! Vegies for the omelette.
The more colours the better! Vegies for the omelette.

My great friend and naturopath colleague Kathleen Murphy recently wrote this excellent post about some new research regarding how eating the right type of breakfast can reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome.

I’ve written before on my love of the popular breakfast meal, the omelette, and I’ve shared my dairy-free omelette recipe. I don’t consider them to be only a breakfast food. Omelettes also make excellent, quick and easy lunches and dinners. And oh boy, by varying the ingredients you add to the egg mix you can create a range of tasty delights.

The ingredients you can add are endless, but here are some I like:

  • Tomatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Sweet potato
  • Pumpkin
  • Mushrooms
  • Capsicum
  • Zucchini
  • Harissa chilli paste
  • Fresh chilli
  • Fresh herbs

And here are some omelettes I’ve made lately:

Cherry tomato, Spanish onion and fresh basil leaves
Cherry tomato, Spanish onion and fresh basil leaves
Pumpkin, harissa, cherry tomato and mixed fresh herbs
Pumpkin, harissa, cherry tomato and mixed fresh herbs
Kalamata olives, grape tomatoes and dill
Kalamata olives, grape tomatoes and dill
Sugar snap peas, cherry tomatoes, pumpkin and parsley
Sugar snap peas, cherry tomatoes, pumpkin and parsley

On looking at these photos I’ve realised I seem to have a great fondness for cherry tomatoes. I promise that they aren’t in every omelette I make, just the ones I photograph apparently!

Have you got a vegie omelette combination that’s a winner? Share it in the comments.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

Diet, fertility, food, food allergy, recipe, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Vegetarian quiche: a tasty gluten & dairy-free recipe

quicheOn the weekend I gave this paleo quiche recipe a whirl. I have to say that I was mightily impressed.

The great thing about the paleolithic diet is that they don’t use grains or dairy and so us gluten and dairy-free people can borrow their recipes.

Even though you have to make the base (which is made from almond meal, eggs and fresh herbs), it’s still quite a quick and easy recipe.

I doubled the zucchini and onion in the recipe – but would love to try this recipe with some sweet potato and maybe some olives to add  sweet and salty flavours to the recipe, plus some extra colour. I’d also add another one or two eggs to the filling to have it rise a little higher on the base when cooked. Use coconut oil instead of butter in the base if you are doing the dairy-free version.

From a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, this quiche is a Yin and Blood nourishing dish. The almonds are moistening for the digestive system and lungs, and the eggs nourish the fluids and blood of the body (particularly they are noted as a female reproductive organ tonic). If you want to nourish the Blood further, add spinach or kale to this recipe.

The base was delicious and minus the savoury herbs would make an excellent base for a sweet fruit tart. This will be my next cooking experiment and I shall report back! Watch this space…

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

Diet, food, food allergy, recipe

Hail to the humble omelette

The humble omelette has many a time been my saviour. When I’m rushed for time, whipping up a quick omelette can make a tasty, nutritious breakfast, lunch or dinner in under ten minutes.

This popular whipped egg dish has variations found in countries all over the world, including Thailand (kai yat sai), Philippines (torta), China (egg foo yung), Japan (tamagoyaki), Iran (khagine) and France, where the word omelette was born in the mid-16th century.

From a food as medicine point of view, eggs are relatively high in protein when considering their low-calorie value.  Each egg usually contains around 6.3g protein.  As well as being a complete protein source for vegetarians, eggs also contain vitamin B12.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) considers eggs to be neutral in temperature and nourish blood and ‘yin’ (fluids) in the body.  In people with excessive mucus or fluid in the body, eggs can exacerbate phlegmy and sluggish symptoms.  Some people are allergic to eggs and may take advantage of egg substitutes such as silken tofu in omelettes (but in other types of cookery you might like to try these).

Now, my recipe:

Tasty, quick & nutritious dairy-free omelette

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 eggs
  • 1 dessertspoon of water for each egg
  • Olive or coconut oil
  • Small onion or shallot (finely chopped)
  • Garlic (crushed)
  • Mixed vegetables – Eg. mushrooms, sweet potato, pumpkin, potato, broccoli, green beans, capsicum, asparagus, corn, spinach, basil, parsley, chives or whatever you like (sliced finely)
  • Freshly ground pepper and a pinch of sea salt

Method:

  1. Beat eggs with water until fluffy.
  2. Heat oil in pan, when hot saute onion, garlic and any hard vegetables (eg. sweet potato) until soft.
  3. Pour beaten eggs over sautéed vegetables.
  4. Sprinkle salt and pepper over eggs.
  5. Turn heat down, cover with a lid.
  6. Remove from heat when cooked through.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.