acupuncture, health, massage, Traditional Chinese Medicine

My clinic turned 1 this week!

Yin yang cupcake iced solo webCan you believe it? My little Broadbeach clinic, Sarah George Acupuncture & Natural Health, has celebrated her first birthday this week.

A birthday is not complete without cake – so here’s one of my recipes: Yin Yang cupcakes (gluten free)

It’s been a lovely year in the clinic, growing from helping just a few patients to now seeing a lovely group of people in need of holistic acupuncture and natural health care treatment for a range of women’s health, pregnancy and fertility conditions, chronic pain and illness and neurological disorders. Thank you to my patients and anyone who has referred someone to me.

After working in busy, multi-room clinics for most of my career it’s nice to slow things down and provide other Chinese Medicine therapies as needed, like tuina (Chinese massage), gua sha (scraping – not as scary as it sounds), moxa and cupping (there are so many different ways of having cupping done).

Next week I’ll be announcing an exciting new therapy in the clinic – stay tuned!

So thank you for being a part of my clinic’s first year whether you’ve been a patient or just followed along on this blog, facebook, twitter or instagram with the idea of one day coming in for a treatment.

Here’s to another great year! See you in the clinic. Call 07 5526 8632 to make an appointment.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture, fertility, herbal medicine, IVF, pregnancy, Traditional Chinese Medicine

The essence of my Master of Health Science (TCM) degree boiled down to 6 things you might not know about women’s health

2013: The original crew in our second year. We're all lecturers at Endeavour College of Natural Health now: Nicky Macdonald, Sarah George, Lori-Ellen Grant, David Schievenin
2013: The original crew in our second year. We’re all lecturers at Endeavour College of Natural Health now: Nicky Macdonald, Sarah George, Lori-Ellen Grant, David Schievenin

After four years of studying a Master of Health Science (Traditional Chinese Medicine) degree at the University of Western Sydney (UWS), balancing study with lecturing and clinical practice, I can say that I have finally finished! (It’s been such a long time the uni has even changed its name in that time to Western Sydney University – WSU!)

I am really glad I’ve had the opportunity to do this course. I have learnt so much, made great friends and studied under some of the great Chinese Medicine teachers in the world.

While I’m very grateful to have my Saturday nights back (no more late night researching and assignment writing) here’s a few things I am very happy to have learnt while reading everything I could on the following women’s health topics:

I studied a diverse range of topics in addition to women’s health (eg. osteoarthritis, anorgasmia and irritable bowel syndrome) which I’ll cover in subsequent blogs.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture, fertility, pregnancy

4 things you always wanted to know about acupuncture in pregnancy

Kathleen and I presenting at the Woodford Folk Festival's Blue Lotus stage.
Kathleen and I presenting at the Woodford Folk Festival’s Blue Lotus stage.

So my gorgeous friend and one of Sydney’s finest naturopaths, Kathleen Murphy, asked me some questions last week about the use of acupuncture in pregnancy.

The questions were all about those things you’ve always wondered about:

  • Is acupuncture safe?
  • What can it do?
  • What about those acupuncture inductions?
  • Can it really help a baby to turn into a good position for birth?

Well I’ve answered all these and more… check out my answers here.

And check out Kathleen’s blog too – she shares some fantastic ideas on healthy living. Kathleen consults with patients at a clinic in Double Bay.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

acupuncture, fertility, herbal medicine, IVF, pregnancy, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Can acupuncture enhance your fertility and support your pregnancy?

Pregnant belly kissHere’s a little guest piece I wrote for the Endeavour College of Natural Health Wellnation Clinics, How can Chinese Medicine enhance your fertility?

Helping men and women with fertility and those subsequent pregnancies is one of my favourite areas of practice, and one that I have studied intensively and had a lot of experience in treating with acupuncture and natural medicine treatment (whether it’s pre-conception care, assisting a patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome or low sperm count, or supporting a patient through IVF).

If you wish to have a baby, are having difficulty in conceiving or are looking for supportive care in pregnancy, please contact me. I’d be happy to assist you with your journey.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture, fertility, health, IVF, pregnancy

New clinic now open at Broadbeach on the Gold Coast

Clinic tableHello!

It’s been too long! I hope you’ve all been well.

Things have been both busy and restorative since I moved from Brisbane to be the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at Endeavour College of Natural Health’s Gold Coast campus.

So I have good news… my new clinic is open at Broadbeach – finally! Hooray!

To book, call: 07 5526 8632.

I have a lovely clinic space where you can enjoy Chinese Medicine services to enhance your health:

  • Acupuncture
  • Acupuncture Point Injection Therapy
  • TCM Remedial Massage (tuina)
  • Cupping and guasha
  • Chinese dietary therapy

My focus will continue to be on women’s health including pregnancy, fertility & IVF support, but also conditions including period pain, irregular menstrual cycles, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, proconception care, pre-birth treatment, menopausal symptoms, stress, anxiety, insomnia, digestive complaints, body pains and enhancing general wellbeing.

Enjoy the following clinic tour:

Clinic table supplies
Relax here…
Clinic books
More obstetric, fertility and women’s health texts than you can poke a stick at!
Clinic cups
Ever had cupping? It’s great – ask me about it.
Clinic bookshelf
Chinese medicine and natural health library

There’s plenty of free parking on the street too.

I’m also looking very forward to bringing you regular blog posts to help you to enhance your wellness too.

I hope to see you in clinic soon! And/or feel free to share this post with people you know on the Gold Coast who need a good acupuncturist.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

acupuncture, Diet, fertility, food, martial arts, nature, pregnancy, Traditional Chinese Medicine

10 things you should know about Chinese Medicine

I’ve spoken at a few Endeavour College of Natural Health open days now. Prior to presenting to the prospective students I always get to thinking about all of the things I love about acupuncture and Chinese medicine. This medicine really has been a great lifetime passion of mine. (“Really?” You say.)

So here are the top 10 reasons why I love acupuncture and Chinese medicine:

  1. Diagnosis and treatment are completely individualised. It doesn’t matter if you have osteoarthritis, endometriosis or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), in Chinese medicine we are interested in your unique signs and symptoms and we may give you a Chinese medicine diagnosis which is completely different from that of another person with the same disease name but a slightly different presentation. Your treatment will be individualised just for you.
  2. Yin yang cupcake iced solo webThere are no super foods. Or good foods. Or bad foods. Or fad diets. I know that goji berries and shiitake mushrooms are seen as foods of the gods, and soy has a reputation as the fruit of the devil for every single person on the planet (according to nutrition in the media) but in Chinese medicine we just don’t see it that way. All foods have different energetic properties (eg. cooling, heating, move upwards or downwards, drain damp, nourish blood or open the pores) and so they are used to bring your body back into balance when it isn’t already. For example, if it’s hot it needs cooling and if you are carrying excess fluid you need to drain damp. Of course your body’s needs change as you age, with the season and with illness or regaining health. As this happens your diet also needs to change. It’s not black and white. Which is exactly what the taiji (yin yang) symbol represents: there is always some black in the white and vice versa. Be sensible with your eating, strive for balance and pay attention to how foods make you feel.
  3. 5 elementsThere is a strong connection to nature within the medicine. Five element theory is a way of applying the principles of nature to our bodies. It’s based on thousands of years of observation. We can describe and diagnose people’s temperaments and body conditions according to Earth, Metal, Water, Wood and Fire. Each element relies upon and is interrelated to the others to keep delicate balance. Just like nature is. For example too much Earth can make us heavy, too much water can create fluid retention and too much fire can make us overheated. It’s a more complex system them this but those are just some simple examples.
  4. It can be an outright treatment, an alternative or a complementary medicine. So we all know that acupuncture alone is sometimes great for sorting out that sore shoulder or helping you sleep better. Other times acupuncture can work very well alongside other western medicine treatment. Some conditions that spring to mind are when we use acupuncture with IVF treatment or alongside chemotherapy which may reduce some of the side effects like nausea. As acupuncture does not involve ingestion of herbs or medicines it is rarely contraindicated with other therapies.
  5. Most people feel relaxed and emotionally ‘like a weight has lifted’ immediately following an acupuncture treatment. Patients often comment that they can fall asleep during an acupuncture treatment when they can’t take afternoon naps at home. It is a relaxing treatment and believe it or not – no the needles don’t really hurt most of the time. In fact relaxation has been described as a side effect of acupuncture in this study.
  6. ear acupuncture modelHaving a knowledge of acupuncture and acupressure is like having a first aid kit with you wherever you go. Symptoms like nausea and headaches can often be relieved if you know the right spots to push. I often take some ‘ear seeds’ with me when I go camping or hiking to manage musculoskeletal pains (these little seeds apply pressure to parts of the ear that correspond to other parts of your body – like acupressure. Anyone who has used a Sea-Band on their wrist for seasickness is doing acupressure – you place the hard bit of the band onto an acupuncture point! Of course, it can’t do everything and it’s always handy to have a regular first aid kit too.
  7. Energy flow is fundamental to Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Learning good posture and effective breathing is essential not only to good health but also being a good practitioner. Think of tai chi, Qi gong, yoga and martial arts. We apply these same postural and breathing techniques when inserting needles. But really, you can apply good posture and effective breathing to everything that you do.
  8. The history of Chinese Medicine is decorated with beautiful stories, poetry and artworks to document and share the medicine. An appreciation of the arts is also considered a part of holistic healthcare. I often describe to my fertility or pregnancy patients that one of the acupuncture points is called ‘zigong’ or ‘the palace of the child’. How gorgeous is that? We can incorporate these beautiful descriptions into meditations or visualisations during treatment.
  9. The future of Chinese medicine is bright as we are now seeing higher quality clinical trials to highlight traditional and new uses for our medicines. For example the research using fMRI to understand the effect of acupuncture needling on the brain is fascinating. Check out this BBC documentary for a look at this research. (It’s an hour long but it’s well worth it.)
  10. In Australia we are now a registered profession (just like physiotherapists and dentists). This means that acupuncturists, Chinese herbalists and Chinese medicine practitioners now have to comply with AHPRA regulations under the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia (CMBA) including a minimum level of education (bachelor degree) and other professional and ethical standards. So in the interests of public safety and getting the most effective treatment for your condition always seek treatment from a CMBA registered practitioner. (For the record, dry needling is not registered in this way.)

Just a word of warning: nowhere here have I said Chinese medicine is a cure all. I just wanted to highlight the things that Chinese medicine does really well. For information about your own health please speak with a registered Chinese medicine practitioner.

What is it that you love about acupuncture and Chinese medicine? Tell me in the comments. I’d love to know.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture

Remember that one time when acupuncture featured in The Young Ones

 

Acupuncture pops up from 6.50 minutes into The Young Ones episode titled “Sick”. Although I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t want to watch it from the beginning because The Young Ones is so bwilliant! Watch out for the cameo from Madness too.

This video demonstrates why you should only get acupuncture from an AHPRA (Chinese Medicine Registration Board) registered acupuncturist and not someone like Vyvyan, the medical student. We use fine needles inserted with a technique that has been developed over a four year bachelor degree course and beyond rather than Vyvyan’s 6 inch nails that are tapped in with a hammer.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.