Diet, food, recipe, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Strawberries: how to eat ’em and why they are good for you

StrawberrySo strawberries have been in the news at the moment and for all of the wrong reasons. But that doesn’t mean that they are not a) tasty and b) good for you!

You may also be helping our farmers out with their glut of beautiful fruit that is now unlikely to be sold at the quantities they’d hoped.

Here’s what strawberries are generally considered to do for us from a Chinese Medicine point of view:

  • Thermal nature: cooling
  • Flavour: sweet, sour
  • Effect: Forms body fluids and Blood

So this means that the delicious red goodness that is a strawberry is refreshing, the sweetness promotes the production of body fluids (good for those people who have problems associated with dryness), the sourness conserves those body fluids and the red colour means this fruit is beneficial for making Blood. On the last point, strawberries are considered to be high in vitamin C and we know that this is helpful in absorbing iron – you might want to team your strawberries up as a dessert following an iron rich meal. Don’t eat too many strawberries (especially raw) if you run cold or are prone to loose bowel motions.

So what should you do with your strawberries, especially if you’ve picked up a bumper pack at a bargain price? (After you’ve sliced them first for safety reasons.)

Well in Chinese Medicine, the general rule is not to eat too much raw food (especially with a cooling nature and especially if you already feel cold) so maybe eat a few raw strawberries. The rest can be cooked up in any one of these great sounding healthy, strawberry recipes. Failing that, you can always dip a few in the finest quality, fair trade, 70+% cacao, dark chocolate. Yum.

So support the farmers, enjoy your strawberries and just be sure to cut them (and maybe cook them up) first.

To book an acupuncture appointment at either Launceston clinic or for further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

Diet, food, food allergy, health, recipe, Traditional Chinese Medicine

New Launceston workshop: Cook Healthy Japanese Food

Hello! It’s been a little while since my last post (I’ve been busy) but I’m here to say that the great Sam Seghers from Mindful Menus and Redcliffe Yoga & Massage is coming to Launceston (from Redcliffe, QLD) to team up with me for a fun and informative workshop!

Cook Healthy Japanese Food – Saturday 11th August (1pm-3pm)

Header Cooking Healthy Japanese Food

So Sam is a whizz with Japanese cookery (having lived there for 14 years). She is going to take some great Tasmanian fresh produce and create several tasty Japanese dishes. And she’ll be able to answer all those tricky questions you have about ingredients like:

  • the seaweeds (e.g. wakame and kombu – what on earth do you do with them?)
  • tofu (how do you cook it so it doesn’t taste like a sponge?)
  • mushrooms (e.g. shiitake, king oyster – what do you do with them?)
  • green tea (e.g. what to look for in a good Japanese tea and how to brew it)
  • miso (everyone is talking about it – what is it and what do you do with it?)
  • And many more…

All food prepared on the day will be gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, vegetarian and vegan although we are also happy to discuss substitutions for other diet styles, food allergies and intolerances.

My job in all of this is to introduce you to the exciting world of Chinese Dietetics. This will change the way you think about food in a very healthy and balanced way.

In Chinese dietetics we talk about the thermal nature of a food (e.g. cold, cool, neutral, warm, hot), the flavour (bitter, sweet, pungent, salty, sour) and the organs that each food has an affinity with. You’ll discover that no wholefood should be considered good (eat tonnes of it) or evil (avoid it at all costs) for every person in the same way. We’ll talk about balance of thermal nature and flavours in your meal. And we’ll go through the Chinese dietetic properties of each food we use in the recipes on the day and the over all benefits of the dish (including the cooking methods) so that you know which ones will benefit you most.

During this time you’ll also enjoy the most amazing healthy Japanese afternoon tea banquet of all the dishes we have created on the day.  Having been lucky enough to have attended several of Sam’s Japanese banquets in the past I assure you that these dishes are delicious!

If you’re interested in learning a little more about Chinese Dietetics here’s a post I wrote a while ago on balancing the five flavours in a meal.

To book tickets to Cook Healthy Japanese Foods visit our Eventbrite page.

For further information on the event visit the event on Sarah George Acupuncture on Facebook.

To book an appointment at the clinic or for further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

food, health, herbal medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Uncategorized

Do you know these herbs and spices?

Sri Lanka AHG cardamom tea
Cardamom black tea

So a lot of us use a range of herbs and spices in our cooking and medicines and yet we may not have a clue what they actually look like when they’re growing on the bush or vine or tree. (I also know some of you grow an extensive range of herbs in your gardens and very much know what they look like and how to use them.)

By definition herbs are plants of a particular type (soft, succulent and mostly grown from seed) but this doesn’t truly capture all of the plants we use as herbs. Broadly speaking, herbs can be any plant we use in medicine, food, flavouring, for fragrance or even as a dye.

While I was in Sri Lanka late last year I wanted to visit as many Ayurvedic herbal gardens as I could to learn more about these medicinal plants. Here are some photos I took at the Ananda Spice Garden (near Koggala Lake) of some herbs you may use on regular rotation in your kitchen or even in a medicinal brew:

Sri Lanka AHG aloe vera
Aloe Vera
Sri Lanka AHG cinnamon
Cinnamon
Sri Lanka AHG ginger
Ginger
Sri Lanka AHG red ginger
Red ginger
Sri Lanka AHG vanilla
Vanilla

Aren’t they gorgeous?

And if you are interested, here is a east-west fusion (read: not Classical Chinese Medicine but still really interesting) of the Five Elements of herbs I found in one of my favourite, old herb books – Isobell Shiphard’s How can I use herbs in my daily life?

Isabell Shipard 5 element herbs

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

food, health, herbal medicine, motivational, nature

Discovering the traditional medicine of Sri Lanka

rooster-year-of-qing
Year of the Rooster: this cocky fellow is a Chinese incense burner crafted in the Qing Dynasty.

Hello! Happy new year! And happy Chinese new year too! May the Rooster be good to you all.

It seems like it has been such a long time since I have written a blog. The good news is that I’m excited to get back into it and share so many interesting regarding acupuncture, Chinese medicine, traditional medicines, good food (and recipes) and all things wellness related.

Some of my patients will know that in December I closed the clinic for a month and headed to Sri Lanka for a study tour of traditional medicine, yoga and learning about that fabulous medicinal drink, tea.

I’m going to walk you through what I’ve learnt about traditional Sri Lankan medicines and what one might have to gain by visiting an ayurvedic retreat. We’ll visit herb gardens and farms, discover some delicious traditional Sri Lankan recipes, several different types of tea plantations and factories (so that we can understand the process of making tea and how that process changes the flavour and qualities of the tea), visit some stunning natural scenery to remind us of the power of green spaces and finally visit an acupuncture college where students treat patients in desperate need of good care.

I’m looking forward to sharing this with you all over the next few weeks and months. But until then you can find me at my Broadbeach clinic every Friday.

Also if there is a topic you think I should write about this year feel free to leave it in the comments.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

 

Diet, food, food allergy, recipe, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Uncategorized

Banana coconut fritters – pikelet style

I’ve recently signed up to get an organic vegetable box delivered each week from the fabulous Farmer Foster. Together with a bounty of great vegetables is an array of beautiful fruit.

vegetable box farmer foster

One such fruit I have in abundance is bananas. I’m a sucker for a banana fritter so I decided to experiment with a dairy and gluten free version with no added sugar; let’s face it, bananas are just about sweet enough anyway!

According to Chinese dietetic theory bananas are considered to be sweet in flavour and cold in thermal nature. They have an affinity with the Stomach and Large Intestine so together with their flavour and thermal nature they moisten the fluids (Yin) of these digestive organs. Bananas are traditionally used for dry throats and constipation. Autumn and winter bring dryness so a lot of us need some extra Yin nourishing at this time. Frying the fritters and adding a touch of cinnamon helps to warm up the bananas a little too.

banana coconut fritter served

Banana coconut fritter recipe

Ingredients

  • 300g bananas, mashed
  • 3 tbsp brown rice flour
  • 2 tbsp desiccated coconut
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder (gluten free)
  • 1/8 tsp baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • pinch of stevia to taste
  • cinnamon to taste
  • coconut oil for frying

Method

  1. Mix all dry ingredients together.
  2. Add mashed banana and mix until combined.
  3. In a frying pain, heat coconut oil to medium heat and shallow fry heaped dessertspoons of banana mixture until golden on each side.
  4. When cooked, remove fritters from pan and place on a plate covered with a sheet of paper towel.
  5. Serve warm, sprinkled with toasted coconut and if desired a scoop of coconut milk icecream.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

Diet, food, food allergy, recipe, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Uncategorized

Carrot cake goodie balls

I have resisted the goodie ball/bliss ball craze so far but recently at an Endeavour College of Natural Health open day I came across a recipe that was a must try: these Carrot Cake goodie balls (gluten and dairy free) designed by a former student of the college. And I have to say they were absolutely delicious and a better alternative to other snacks that have been hanging around since the holiday period. They’re great to fit into the lunch box too. I’m now a goodie ball convert.

I did put my own spin on them to Chinese Medicine them up a bit. Given that the ingredients were raw I wanted to add a little more warming spice to the mix to aid digestion (there is cinnamon in them already though) as the recipe is quite rich. That was the addition of some uncrystallised ginger (like the crystallised but without the sugar crust on the outside) and I replaced the sultanas with currants, just because I like them more. The nut base is made with walnuts which already have a warm energy too.

So this recipe has Earth element written all over it. Sweet, orange coloured and carrot flavoured with some nice spice. It’ll nourish your Spleen, Stomach, Qi and Yin.

What are your favourite goodie balls? Why not share the recipe in the comments below. Let’s have a goodie ball recipe swap!

Enjoy!

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

 

Diet, food, food allergy, herbal medicine, recipe

Make your own delicious Chinese tea eggs

Tea eggs finished product

Yes, Chinese tea eggs.

Just imagine something like a boiled egg soaked in soy sauce with a blend of black tea and spices similar to those used to make chai. And I do love chai.

Okay. That does sound weird but I assure you that these eggs are delicious. And they’re great in winter as the spices add a warming energy to the eggs.

Another ingredient in these eggs is tangerine/mandarin/citrus peel. You can make your own dried citrus peel if you like. In Chinese Medicine we refer to the peel as ‘chen pi’ and it’s used to resolve a condition known as ‘food stagnation’. That is, when you over eat or feel like you’ve got food stuck in your stomach that moves slowly. Chen pi is a good accompaniment to rich food to aid digestion.

I also substituted the soy sauce for gluten free tamari.

These tasty, protein-rich treats are often made for Chinese New Year but why not have them all year round?

Here’s the recipe I use.

And here is a photo journey of making my tea eggs:

Tea eggs boiling
Boil the eggs only for 3 minutes. Afterwards gently crack the shells without breaking through them.
Tea eggs spices
Prepare your spices, and put aside some soy sauce and a touch of sugar.
Tea eggs boiling spices
Add the spices and soy sauce to the water with the eggs with their cracked shells, then boil and simmer.
Tea eggs finished product
After soaking the eggs for at least 2 hours you can peel the eggs. The longer you soak the eggs the darker the marbling effect on the egg whites will be!

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.