aromatherapy, health, herbal medicine

The delight of organic lavender and rosehip oils for scar healing

lavender fieldJust before I went in for my hip arthroscopy, I received a gorgeous package of two new oils on the market. The couple who sent them, David & Melanie Dane, used to own Sunspirit Aromatherapy and have ventured back into the oils business as Free Spirit Group, scouring the world for producers of high therapeutic grade, organic products and have brought two new oils into Australia. And luckily for me both of these oils are regarded as excellent skin healers, perfect for scar repair from my keyhole surgery. I religiously used them on my little incisions from my surgery with good effect. Plus they were also delightful to use.

Modern aromatherapy was discovered in France when a chemist burnt his hand badly and dipped it into the first vat of liquid he found – lavender oil! He was very impressed with his fast healing.

Of course these oils have many other therapeutic uses, you can read about them via the links below. If you’re looking for good quality, certified organic oils that are ethically sourced and produced, read the fascinating stories about these products:

You can buy them online here. (BTW I don’t get kick backs for these – I just think these are excellent products from a company that is worth sharing.)

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

aromatherapy, beauty, health

Change: what you need to know about your skincare

The first of The Health & Happiness Collective has written on our topic, ‘Change’.

Ananda, a brilliant naturopath and fellow lecturer at Endeavour College of Natural Health, has written about her passion for natural skin care. Why is natural skin care better? And why should you change your skin care?

Ananda sums this up beautifully. Which is ideal when we are talking skin care and aesthetics. But don’t forget that your skin reflects your health and what you place on your skin can affect your health.

And I have to agree completely with Ananda, changing my skincare (and makeup) over to natural products has not only been beneficial to my skin but is also far more luxurious given the delightfully aromatic natural extracts and essential oils they contain.

Check out her must-read blog with five reasons to change your skincare here.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal medicine, motivational

The Health & Happiness Collective

Hopping along and sharing the good words just like Kermit the Frog

Folks, I have exciting news!

I’ve just joined up with a group of some of Australia’s best acupuncturists, naturopaths, aromatherapists and horticulturalists to share our collective knowledge with you!

We’re called The Health & Happiness Collective and we’re doing a blog hop.

A what?!

A blog hop is an event. It means that each blogger from The Health & Happiness Collective will share some of their knowledge and experience through their blog in the next few weeks. We’re all going to write on the same topic so you are going to get a range of different viewpoints to stimulate your mind and bring you good health and happiness  in line with our theme.

The theme for our very first blog hop is:

CHANGE

When each blogger writes, I’m going to let you know so you can get on over and read what these brilliant people have to say.

Here’s a quick preview of the clever people (and their blogs) who form The Health & Happiness Collective:

 

We’re really excited to bring this blog hop to you. Get ready to explore ‘change’ in a health and happiness context.

But before we share, what thoughts and emotions come to mind for you on the topic of change? Use the comments section to share your responses.

And I’ll leave you with this great quote:

“If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” – Wayne Dyer

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.

aromatherapy, Diet, emotional health, fertility, nature, Traditional Chinese Medicine

In the summertime… you have these good living tips on your mind.

It’s summer in the Southern Hemisphere! And so here’s a cliché summery tune to put you in the mood – just press play as you read on…

I recently attended a workshop on living with the seasons and the theme of course, was summer – and how to do it well. Chinese Medicine places great importance on living with the seasons to optimise our health in the present but also in the seasons to come.

Here’s a few ideas on living well this season. Pick and choose the ones you like to make sure that you absorb a year’s supply of summer energy (or yang) while it is abundant.

Summer is all about these (and this is not conclusive and they are in no particular order):

  • hibiscusPleasure.
  • Blossoming. Showing your true, wonderful self to the world.
  • The Fire element. Red. Heart. Small Intestine. Bitter foods. Joy.
  • Fertility. Bearing fruit.
  • Watching thunderstorms.
  • Abundant yang.
  • Nourishment.
  • Walking barefoot on the sand and grass.
  • Sips of iced peppermint tea. (Cold drinks in moderation.)
  • Stargazing.
  • Soaking up a little sun. (How much do you need in your region?)
  • Prosperity and beauty.
  • Social butterflies. Extroversion.
  • Siestas.
  • An open mind, curiosity and an optimistic mood.
  • Rosewater, mint and cooling aromatherapy face & body mists.
  • Colourful, light and flowing clothing.
  • Pretty frocks.
  • Outdoor dinner parties.
  • A slice of fruit after a meal.

Not everyone loves the summer. Think of what makes you more comfortable in hot weather and prepare yourself in late spring or early summer with these:

  • A change in diet. Lighter, more cooling foods with bitter and acrid flavours. Read more about summer eating.
  • Lighter sheets and bedclothes.
  • A fan.
  • Earlier to rise, later to bed with an after-lunch nap if you can.
  • A change in wardrobe or at least storing your winter wardrobe away.
  • A new hat and/or sunglasses.
  • Getting close to (or in) the ocean, a lake or river.
  • Be most physically active in the coolest parts of the day.
  • Resist the urge to spend the whole day in airconditioning – get some summer air each day.
  • It’s okay to perspire but be sure to rehydrate by increasing your water intake.
  • Chat to your Chinese Medicine practitioner if you are still struggling to embrace the summer.

What does summer mean to you? And what tips do you have to enjoy the summer?

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

aromatherapy, Diet, herbal medicine, mental health, Traditional Chinese Medicine

5 natural medicine tips for surviving the exam period

Exam time is notorious for late nights of sugar and caffeine fueled binges.  Your stress levels soar and your sleep quantity plummets. This handy venn diagram explains the delicate balance between study, sleep and social life. I have compiled a list of natural medicine tips to help you cruise through the exam period light a Jedi!

  1. Feed your brain – Instead of reaching for that family size block of chocolate and the whole bag of M&Ms to get you through a night of study look instead to increasing your intake of nature’s brain foods. Traditional Chinese Medicine considers that optimal thinking and optimal digestion are related. Take yourself away from your books to eat and eat foods that you know make you feel well. Nuts (walnuts even look like a brain!), seeds and fish are good sources of omega 3 fatty acids which are essential to maintaining good nervous system function. Increasing your vegetable and wholegrain intake will keep your energy levels more stable than a sugar binge will, so that you’ll feel energised yet calm. For short burst energy snacks pick some snacks such as berries, sliced fruit or dried fruits. Keep up the water too – your brain needs to be adequately hydrated to perform at its best!
  2. Sleep on it – The time when you lose the most sleep is often when you need it most. If you can, make sure that you have covered (or at least skimmed) the content you need at least the day before your exam and then aim for 8 hours sleep that night. You will be calmer, have greater focus and clarity, and improved memory recall.
  3. Vaporise essential oils – There has been some fascinating research on the use of smells and memory recall via the limbic system. We’ve all experienced a time when a smell has invoked a memory from our past. Use this to your advantage as you study. Vaporise the essential oil of your choosing while you study a particular topic. When you enter the exam room put a drop of that same essential on a tissue and tuck it into your shirt. This may increase your memory recall from when you studied that content. The oils that are most often associated with concentration, focus and memory are lemon, peppermint, basil and rosemary.
  4. Rosemary for remembrance – This herb is known as the memory herb. It is associated in folklore with remembrance and is used on Remembrance Day for this reason. You can use it straight from your garden in cooking, baking or even as a herbal tea (it combines beautifully with lemon myrtle). A study was conducted examining the effects of rosemary on cognitive function. One group was given cold tomato juice to drink while the other had the same tomato juice with added rosemary. The rosemary group performed significantly better than the plain tomato juice group. And interestingly, the plain tomato juice seemed to have a negative impact on cognitive function – so keep clear of it during exams.
  5. Become a herb nerd – There are several herbs that have been researched extensively for concentration, focus and memory function. Two of the most popular ones are ginkgo biloba and bacopa. These herbs are available in tablet form or can be developed by an herbalist into an individualised herbal formula to suit your specific situation. The addition of ginseng is an excellent way to boost energy levels for late night study sessions without the use of strong coffee.

And if the above tips aren’t enough, make sure to check in with your health practitioner to assist your focus and recall. Acupuncture usually works a treat at times of high stress!

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Even your pet can benefit from acupuncture

dog acupunctureI spent today with a gorgeous friend, her incredibly clever and kind seven-year old daughter and their adorable devon rex cat.

Miss Seven was over the moon to be able to demonstrate her new vet kit to me.  The vet kit was a little basket of goodies she had put together to treat her animals. It included freshly pressed basil oil, some raw ginger, eucalyptus leaves, a sewing pin and her own written notes on pet medicine.

We started by treated the toy dog. He had a sore back and irritated eyes. With our combination of herbal rubs and sewing pin acupuncture we cured him.

But you know, pets (of the living, breathing variety) really can benefit from complementary medicines just as well as people can. Acupuncture, acupressure, herbal medicine, nutritional medicine (such as omega 3 fatty acids), homeopathics and aromatherapy can work a treat for our furry friends for their physical and mental ailments. Some good vets include these therapies in their practice – it’s always worth asking about.

Today’s work with the seven-year old complementary medicine veterinary doctor reminded me of this fabulous video showcasing the effect of acupuncture on the most adorable little pug puppy who suffered with paralysis from a car accident. Her recovery is remarkable.

To book an appointment at the clinic or further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health.

aromatherapy

Spritz yourself cool with essential oils

peppermint leavesIt’s a very hot day today in Brisbane.  Some parts of South East Queensland are expected to hit 41°C.  Scorching hot!

I’m sitting at my computer marking my Musculoskeletal Acupuncture students’ assignment papers and struggling to think, my brain has sizzled.  However, a few brain cells must still be functioning as they’ve reminded me about some aromatherapy spritzers I used to make in my late teens for staying cool on a hot day.

Make this spritzer up, spray on your face and body, then stand in front of the fan.  Refreshed! Repeat as often as necessary.

Remember to use 100% pure essential oils (they should be labelled this way with the botanical name of the plant) in your spritzer, as you don’t want to be inhaling any more artificial chemicals than you are already subjected to and the therapeutic effects will only come from pure plant oils, not cheap  and nasty chemical fragrances.  My preference is Sunspirit Oils.  I’ve toured their testing laboratory recently (and also worked for them many moons ago) and was very impressed with the attention to quality of their therapeutic essential oils.

So here are a few recipes for your spritzer bottles.

Add to a 50mL spritzer bottle:

  • 45mL purified water
  • 1 tsp (5mL) vodka (I know, a waste, but it will help to disperse the oils)
  • 15 drops of essential oils, which could include your choice of:
  1. 6 drops lemon, 5 drops lavender and 4 drops peppermint
  2. 6 drops lime, 5 drops spearmint and 4 drops geranium
  3. Ultra cooling blend: 5 drops peppermint, 5 drops spearmint and 5 drops eucalyptus

Shake the bottle (each time before use), spritz away and chill out. Keep your spritzer in the fridge for even more of a cooling effect.

Still feeling hot?  Here are some ways to eat yourself cool – seriously.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Sarah George (Acupuncture).  Sarah is a practitioner of acupuncture (AHPRA registered), massage therapy and natural health at her Broadbeach clinic and is the Chinese Medicine Senior Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Gold Coast campus.